Tag Archive: michael d brown


 

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Step 2. Live the Frontline Experience. Everyone in the organization, including senior management, should live the frontline experience, both as an employee and as a customer. Spending even a day fulfilling the role of an entry-level frontline associate will provide managers a much more intimate sense of how customer experience is delivered and what will make it as good as possible, and periodic undercover “customer visits” from management are also a must to ensure everything looks as good to the customer as it does to the employees.

Step 3. Smart Tasking. Smart Tasking clearly defines the critical tasks/processes that support the customer service offering and the deadlines by which they must be completed. The most important factor is completing the necessary tasks/processes without impeding the delivery of a customer service experience that shines through the darkest gloom of a recession. Smart Tasking creates a harmonized balance between completing the tasks/processes and delivering a World-Class customer service experience.

To effect Smart Tasking in your organization, simply keep a careful eye on the frontline tasks your employees perform, the order in which they prioritize them, and periodically review them to ensure that they are appropriate and add value to the customer experience. Actively involve the Frontline Employees in Smart Tasking and encourage them to speak up when they find themselves performing tasks that are inefficient, ineffective, or just plain unnecessary.

Whatever time you may “lose” in careful observation and review will more than pay for itself in higher levels of employee efficiency, customer satisfaction, and corporate profits.

Step 4. Create a What-If Arsenal. Inevitably, the frontline employees delivering your customer experience will come across unpredictable circumstances outside their immediate control, such as an out-of-stock product or on-site accident. When fastballs of everyday life are thrown at you and your organization, you need to have a strategy for hitting homeruns in unstable conditions. It’s called life, and the What-If Arsenal is a strategy for life success, regardless of how the economy is doing.

The What-If Arsenal toolbox should be filled with techniques, strategies and scenarios generated by the frontline employees who encounter them every day. Management should then help frontline employees put these ideas into action. The Arsenal constantly grows as the organization grows, and customers will feel confident returning knowing that whatever problems arise, they will be solved quickly!

Step 5. Make-It-Right Power. Once you have given your employees a What-If Arsenal, equip them with the Make-It-Right Power to put that arsenal into action. Make-It-Right Power puts the ability to deliver a world-class customer service experience in the hands of the people who are best able to deliver it: The employees who interact with the customers. It’s about empowering and positioning employees to be able to instantly solve customer problems and view them as opportunities to Make-It-Right now for the customer.

Even once a What-If Arsenal is in place, managers will not always be on hand to supervise employees in executing it. Make-It-Roght power means they don’t have to be.

Step 6. Focus the entire organization on customer service. The entire organization needs to be focused on providing a World-Class customer service experience. The quicker you solve the problem, the greater the opportunity for making the customer happy and keeping him or her coming back. Every program, strategy, and initiative should have an automatic space carved out for providing a World-Class customer service experience.

If the front line is not empowered or it does not have immediate access to someone who is empowered to provide an instant solution to the problem, the problem will remain with the customer longer and fester into something greater and cause him or her to be even more dissatisfied with the experience. And in an ultracompetitive environment for limited customer dollars, dissatisfaction is unacceptable!

Step 6.5 Just Make It Happen. This is a half-step simply meant to remind you that the first six steps do you no good unless you actively put them into practice today and then constantly follow up to ensure they remain in practice (and continue to improve) throughout your organization. It’s one thing to “commit” to fresh customer service, it’s another thing to roll up your sleeves and make it happen.

The cost? Whatever the market rate for elbow grease and determination is these days. Like so many of the most valuable things in life, there is no financial value you can put on them, but they’re worth more than anything you can put a price sticker on. And in a time of scarce resources, they are more precious than ever.

 

 

 

 

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Despite low levels of inflation and unemployment, most Americans still consider themselves living in an economic recession, and with good reason. High-paying, secure jobs with benefits have been replaced by low-paying, uncertain jobs with little or no benefits, leaving people with little money to spread around even as prices remain stable. In this financial climate, the average consumer is buying what they need to get by and little else. Clearly, it’s not the best environment for attracting paying customers to your business.

But despite these obstacles, you can still attract and retain paying customers in the current consumer landscape. How? By using 6.5 steps drawn from my Fresh Customer Service methodology that I developed over years of working in customer-oriented settings, starting as a child handyman. Fresh Customer Service brought me from childhood poverty to exponential success as an executive with several major companies and now as a motivational speaker and career coach. Let’s examine how you can start using Fresh Customer Service today to draw in customers.

Step 1. Make Your Customer Number Two. Since most customer service strategies are partially or wholly based on making the customer number one, then obviously customer service levels must be at an all-time high, right? Everywhere you go, people are raving about how great their daily customer service experiences are, and customer satisfaction polls back this affirmation up with hard data.

I’ll give you a moment to stop laughing before I continue. Hopefully you didn’t snort any of your morning coffee out your nose. We all realize that in far too many cases, the one word that best sums up the state of customer service today is “disaster.” Yet especially in an era where prices have already been slashed, customer service is more important than ever as a competitive differentiator.

The key to running a successful operation is believing and practicing the concept that customers should always come second—employees matter more in the immediate sense and should therefore come first. After all, happy employees unleash their enthusiasm and passion from within, and that passion is contagious. It infects everyone around them, including customers.

And happy employees naturally provide superior customer service. They smile. So thank your employees every day, let them be involved in the planning of the work affecting them, and treat them with the utmost respect and courtesy. Even in times when consumers are looking to do things quickly and cheaply, they will notice… and come back for more!

 

Got 10 seconds? Feed your mind this nutritious thought and experience the exponential growth.

Got 10 seconds? Feed your mind this nutritious thought and experience the exponential growth.

Got 10 seconds? Feed your mind this nutritious thought and experience the exponential growth.

Got 10 seconds? Feed your mind this nutritious thought and experience the exponential growth

Got 10 seconds? Feed your mind this nutritious thought and experience the exponential growth

Got 10 seconds? Feed your mind this nutritious thought and experience the exponential growth

Got 10 seconds? Feed your mind this nutritious thought and experience the exponential growth

Got 10 seconds? Feed your mind this nutritious thought and experience the exponential growth.