Tag Archive: business success


health

 

Social Media

Not having an active presence on major social media networks like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest today is like not having a website 10 years ago. It marks your brand as behind the times and cuts you off from a valuable means of interacting with customers.

Social media is a great way to collect customer feedback, let your customers build a community around your brand, services and products, and communicate in a more personal and informal way. Savvy companies engage in “social listening,” or monitoring social media networks for commentary about your brand to detect positive and negative consumer trends and respond in a timely and appropriate manner. Many technology companies provide software or hosted services to manage social listening.

The same rules about carefully monitoring everything you do and say apply to social media as apply to regular websites or email. In addition, you need to understand that each social media platform has a different purpose. Facebook is good for registering and rewarding fans, Twitter is good for making short, timely announcements, LinkedIn is good for presenting a professional image and for recruiting employees, Instagram and YouTube let you visually represent your company, and Pinterest is where you and your customers can demonstrate how your goods and products can be used in daily life.

Gamification

The average video gamer is a college-aged professional in their mid-30s. The days of the bored teen slumped on the couch playing video games instead of doing homework are long over. A good chunk of your brand’s customer base probably plays video games, and your brand needs to adapt.

Gamification is the increasingly popular practice of applying video game dynamics and contest strategies to online interactions with customers. For example, you could run a contest for customers to post photos of themselves with your product online, with the public invited to vote on the best photos (with prizes, of course). Or customers registering for an online service could have the option of doing so through a mini-video game.

Customers of all ages and professions live in a world of instant gratification and constant entertainment, largely due to the pervasiveness of technology. Your brand should engage with them in kind.

making a first impression

Yes, the three second rule applies to you

One of the key reasons I have been able to pull myself out of poverty and into a life filled with personal and professional success is that I have always maintained an extremely high level of vigor in everything I do. Staying invigorated will give you a huge leg up in making the all-important “three-second impression.” In the three seconds it takes you to walk through a door and extend your hand to someone for the first time, that person has already made irreversible judgments about you. You send out hundreds of signals about yourself, and people read those signals and react to them long before you’ve had a chance to say anything of substance.

Success in the new millennium comes to people who are versatile and can make positive impressions in any group. To ensure those judgments are favorable, have self-confidence, a positive attitude, and a neat appearance.

Also remember that the greatest temptation to give up, to slack off, and to lose sight of your goals will come just before you are about to succeed. Stay laser-focused on achieving exponential personal and professional success—be it for yourself, your career, your organization or your business.

As mentioned earlier, in the three seconds it takes you to walk through a door and extend your hand to someone for the first time, that person has already made irreversible judgments about you. You send out hundreds of signals about yourself, and people read those signals and react to them long before you’ve had a chance to say anything of substance.

Or to help you fully understand the “three-second rule,” think about how critical a high level of physical and mental health is to making a good impression. Imagine someone is meeting you for the very first time. Whether you want to admit it or not, you know they are going to immediately look you up and down and pass judgment on what they see, and you will care deeply what they think. Will they see a person who slumps their shoulders, lets their stomach stick out, and leaves loose, flabby limbs hanging limply, with a facial expression of resigned exhaustion and indifferent grooming and hygiene?

Or will they see a person with broad shoulders and a straight back, with a tight abdomen and taut, well-defined limbs locked into proper posture, smiling confidently and exhibiting impeccable attention to their appearance and cleanliness? Besides requiring regular access to good medical professionals, maintaining this type of health requires a high degree of vigor to keep up with the exercise, diet, active pace and positive attitude needed to make such a stunning first impression.

Ask your friends, boss, colleagues, and other trusted members of your personal network to close their eyes and open them when you walk into the room and give their first impression of you. Compare this impression with your intended impression and work on closing the gaps. You can’t see the big picture if you are in the frame; get help from someone who can tell you what you need to hear.

Remember, success in the new millennium comes to people who are versatile and can make positive impressions in any group. None of this is possible without a constant flow of vigor and confidence that exudes from you and is obvious to everyone you come in contact with. So stay invigorated and make those first three seconds meaningful!